The prophetic foundations of the Islamic State and the radicalization of Islam

The prophetic foundations of the Islamic State and the radicalization of Islam

Catalin Negru | Published: June 1, 2016 | 10:40

Extremism always manifests when societies are struck by chaos or when there is a rupture between leaders and subjects. And the Islamic State is no exception; it rose due to the prolonged war and instability in the Middle East, multiculturalism and the clash of cultures.

Despite its name and its attempts to become a state in the real sense of the word, the Islamic State is just a terrorist organization. The history of the Islamic State began in 2006, when the establishment of the Islamic State of Iraq was declared, comprising Iraq’s six mostly Sunni Arab governorates.1 Abu Omar al-Baghdadi – the leader of the Mujahideen Shura Council – was announced as its emir.2 In April 2010 al-Baghdadi was killed in a joint US-Iraqi raid near the city of Tikrit.3 As a result, one month later Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was appointed the new leader of the Islamic State of Iraq.4 In April 2013, having expanded into Syria amid the civil war, the group changed its name to “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.”5 Only one year later, on June 29, 2014, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant proclaimed itself to be a caliphate (a single Muslim one-world government).6 Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi – surnamed “Caliph Ibrahim” or “Amir al-Mu’minin” (“Commander of the Faithful”) – was named its caliph, and the group renamed itself the “Islamic State”7 (at the moment it is often referred to as IS, ISIS, ISIL or Daesh).

As a caliphate, the Islamic State (through the voice of its caliph) has claimed religious, political and military authority over all Muslims worldwide.8 Based on a Jihadist-Salafism,9 it has promoted religious violence and regarded those who do not agree with its interpretations as infidels or apostates,10 it has demanded the banishment of the “crusaders” (the Christian-foreign invaders) from the Middle East, the restoration of the former glory of the Islamic culture, the return to a pure and original Sunni doctrine, the establishment of a Sunni theocracy (a state governed by the divine law of Sharia) and the rejection of all religious innovations and alterations, believed to corrupt Islam’s original spirit.11

Continue reading

The failure of multiculturalism and the Muslim issue

The failure of multiculturalism and the Muslim issue

Catalin Negru | Last modified: May 5, 2016 | 11:22

There has been a lot of stir lately regarding the Syrian mass migration and its impact upon Europe. Overall, it seems that the Western world divided in two sides: those who defend humanitarianism and accept refugees (regardless of their background) in their countries, and those who refuse refugees and condemn the extreme multiculturalism and the Islamization of Europe. Now, in order to understand what is really happening, why it is happening and, most importantly, how it will evolve in the future, we must approach the problem step by step and starting from the basis. And the first step is to say a few words about the term “culture,” because you cannot speak about multiculturalism without having an idea about the meaning of ”culture.”

Culture, according to Edward Burnett Tylor, is “that complex whole which includes knowledge, belief, art, morals, law, custom and any other capabilities and habits acquired by man as a member of society.”1 Another definition of culture is offered, for example, by Merriam-Webster Dictionary: “the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations.”2

The concepts of culture and civilization (and the relation between them, although they are often used interchangeably) are philosophical issues that are still debated. Nevertheless, simply said, culture is the bridge between intelligence on the one hand, and civilization on the other hand. The level of civilization is a reflection of the level of culture, and the level of culture is a reflection of the level of intelligence. Your civilization is the manifestation of your culture, of your thinking. The more intelligent you are, the better your culture is; and the better your culture is, the better your civilization (standard of living) is.

Continue reading

Racial (in)equality and meritocracy

Racial (in)equality and meritocracy

Catalin Negru | Last modified: April 19, 2016 | 11:04

I know, some of you, given the title of this article, think that I am a racist, neo-Nazi, Hitler’s acolyte, Ku Klux Klan member, White supremacist, xenophobe, brainwashed or even insane. Right at this moment you probably ask yourselves how can I be so blind and ignorant: you have extraordinary friends, co-workers, husband or wife of different race, or maybe even you, the one who reads this text, are a wonderful non-White person.

All human beings are equal, regardless of race, but races are not equal.

But I also know that many of you are confused by the examples and counterexamples that bombard your mind. You are being told not to be racist, but you feel that something is not right; things are different from the media and political propaganda. You see Obama on TV, but you also face the reality every day when you walk on the street, when you take your kids from school or when you go to work. You simply know that some streets, neighborhoods or even cities, dominated by certain races, must be avoided. Those are not safe. So, the signals we receive about racial equality are conflicting and it seems like we stand in front a paradox, isn't it? Only in appearance. The answer to this problem is a little tricky: all human beings are equal, regardless of race, but races are not equal. If you do not understand, do not worry; the following lines will explain it. That being said, before you jump to my neck and socially crucify me, please, for a couple of moments, open your mind, put fear and hypocrisy aside and read what I have to say.

Continue reading