History of the Apocalypse

HISTORY OF THE APOCALYPSE

by Catalin Negru

FIRST EDITION - EBOOK

Copyright © 2015 Catalin Negru. All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review or scholarly journal.

Product details:

ISBN 978-1-329-66764-8

ePub

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Lulu Press, Inc. (www.lulu.com)

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America

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Ana Grigoriu (ana@books-design.com)

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Mirela Lapugean

Dan Bortoc

Robert Manning

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FIRST EDITION - PAPERBACK PRINT-ON-DEMAND

Copyright © 2016 Catalin Negru. All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review or scholarly journal.

Product details:

ISBN 978-1-365-48686-9

576 pages

Black & white

7.44 wide x 9.68 tall

Distributor:

Lulu Press, Inc. (www.lulu.com)

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America

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Booklife.com

Negru, who describes himself as neither a believer nor an atheist, didn’t use the popular phrase “a brief history” in his title for good reason. At 581 pages, the tome is anything but. Negru reminds readers that fascination with the apocalypse isn’t a recent cultural obsession; rather, it’s been a subject of intense interest since the earliest days of recorded history, as evinced by the doctrinal beliefs of all three Abrahamic religions. He also points out that the phrase the end of the world can be interpreted various ways, such as the extinction of humankind, the destruction of Earth, or some other type of transformation or migration. After delineating the views of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on eschatology (the study of the last days), Negru zeros in on how the Christian view, in particular, has been presented from the first to the 21st century, and how it has changed due to “greater knowledge and discovery.” The book is well researched and includes quotes from sacred texts and other scholars. Those obsessed with zombie movies or modern stories of survivalist living may be disappointed that the book stays away from Hollywood’s take. But for those who want to probe the historical and religious teachings on the apocalypse, Negru’s not-so-brief book won’t disappoint.

4.40 stars on Goodreads.com

Latest review on Goodreads [by Mary W]: I’ll start with the minuses: To be honest, reading it all was a challenge. It is very long and in some parts (I think that) it can be improved or simplified. Minor mistakes here and there. Moreover, later I understood that a minimum of information about the three Abrahamic religions had to be included in the first part of the book – which is like 10% of the book – in order to understand the rest of it, but I find religious dogmas quite dull. Now the pluses. In the second part things became interesting. When I reached the section about Emperor Nero and then the age of the world and the 6,000 years I felt like: “Ok, you got my attention!”. From then on things unfolded pretty well. I liked that despite the fact that there is so much stuff – trust me, it is – you don’t feel that you read useless information; on the contrary. It is very dense, but I didn’t get bored. I also liked that the tone was mostly neutral and lucid, and I laughed when he mocked various religious absurdities. I can’t say I know many things about Columbus, Revelation, the Millennium, astrology, mysticism, cults, Nostradamus, prophecies, American awakenings or other topics covered by this book. But I know a thing or two about conspiracies (back in the day I was a big fan). And the section dedicated to conspiracies is, in my opinion, outstanding. Overall, this book makes sense; it is a demonstration of rationality. It is both entertaining and especially informative; it offered me many answers. I recommend it to any person interested in the subject of the apocalypse or to anyone passionate about history or Christianity.

See all the ratings and reviews on Goodreads.com

5 stars on Lulu.com

Latest review on Lulu [by Michael Henderson]: This book is good, no doubt, and offers tons of info about the myth of the apocalypse, how it has affected us over time and lots of other juicy stuff. One big appeal of the book is the fact that it contains quotations and translations of many [I think] original documents. The problem I had is that the author, according to my personal impression, seems to be an atheist, and thus is not without his biases. Nevertheless, I really, really liked this book. I learned so much I didn't know before. The author did a magnificent job laying out the material and information about the issue of the end of the world. I recommend this book to all.

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5 stars on Amazon.com

Latest review on Amazon [by Amazon Customer]: Initially, I was a little skeptic about the book, given the fact it was not rated, but I am fascinated by the subject and I said I should give it a try. It was beyond expectations. Indeed, the first part was a little boring, but now I realize that it had to be included. Nevertheless, overall it is very well written, it contains many details, it is very interesting and I like how it “flows.” It exposes a side of Christian history I never thought at. I have never imagined that so many contemporary movements and things owe their existence to apocalyptic projects. And I definitely did not know, for example, that Nero was believed to be the Antichrist in the first centuries, that Columbus and many like him believed that America was hosting the Garden of Eden or that the early colonists expected Jesus to descend in America. The book was like a revelation and made me see the world around me with different eyes. Definitely a five-star book.

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5 Comments

  1. I don’t even want to imagine how much time and work you had to invest in this book. I read some pages you provided here, and it looks interesting. Maybe one day, when I’ll have time, i’ll read it.

  2. Have been questioning whether James White or Joseph Bates had read Swedenborg…did a search, found your book, will read all and comment..
    Very interesting, the section on EG White.
    Though Swedenborg was very clear that he did not see a physical demolition of earth..ever (see work cited 1149).

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